What clients can we get?
Thread poster: David Maldonado

David Maldonado  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 03:17
Member (2019)
English to Spanish
Jun 9

Hi!

So I've been doing some market research, trying to find clients and emailing some. But I still have some doubts as to who can be a direct client for a subtitler. That's why I want to ask, who can be direct clients and where do I find them? Who would be interest in using subtitles in their content?

I don't mean to come off as a client poacher, no. I really want to know, when looking for clients, what/whose door I should be knocking.

If it's inappropiate
... See more
Hi!

So I've been doing some market research, trying to find clients and emailing some. But I still have some doubts as to who can be a direct client for a subtitler. That's why I want to ask, who can be direct clients and where do I find them? Who would be interest in using subtitles in their content?

I don't mean to come off as a client poacher, no. I really want to know, when looking for clients, what/whose door I should be knocking.

If it's inappropiate to ask, just tel me. I mean no disrespect.
Collapse


 

Tomo Olson  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:17
Japanese to English
My experience Jun 9

Not sure if my comment fits your question exactly, but here's what I've found doing subtitling work for the last four years or so.

I've worked with three different companies as a freelance subtitler. Those companies have access to people/companies who need help. They probably market their services, talk to potential clients (the clients could be TV networks or other businesses) and negotiate their rates, and then they come to someone like myself who's on their freelance reserve list
... See more
Not sure if my comment fits your question exactly, but here's what I've found doing subtitling work for the last four years or so.

I've worked with three different companies as a freelance subtitler. Those companies have access to people/companies who need help. They probably market their services, talk to potential clients (the clients could be TV networks or other businesses) and negotiate their rates, and then they come to someone like myself who's on their freelance reserve list and ask if we are interested in working on a specific project.

My rate is pre-set for the two companies I've worked for (They pay a flat rate per video minute for all projects). With the third company, I had to submit a quote, and they decide who will work on their project.

I take projects from one company pretty much exclusively now as they give me enough work to keep me entertained, and their deadlines are very reasonable although the amount of work fluctuates a lot month to month. They email me or Skype me with a potential project, and I tell them either yes or no. They have a pool of clients that are in the TV industry. The clients may be partners to a TV network. Not sure how many intermediaries are in the chain. With the other two companies I've worked for, it was first-come, first-served, and they had more business-related videos to subtitle (company communication meetings, marketing materials, technical workshops, etc), and the deadlines were a little tighter. One of those two companies do not have a subtitling software of their own, so I had to use a tool I found on the Internet (not ideal in my opinion).

I was given a translation test by all three companies before I was put on their translator list.

So this is how I understand the subtitling industry. I do see subtitling ads on here sometimes, but I don't think a direct relationship between the actual client and the subtitler exists. I've always gone through a subtitling agency of some kind to work on subtitling projects.

Your best bet IMHO is to try out a few agencies and see if any of them suits your fancy.

Good luck to you.
Collapse


 

DZiW (X)
Ukraine
English to Russian
+ ...
Adaptables Jun 9

David, I have been working with several direct/foreign clients for some ten years, so I can tell you that besides good luck (+preparation and references), diversification, business awareness, and foreign language skills as a minor is a must.

First, being a young specialist, I sent and personally handed my tailored CVs to local offices of many related companies. Second, when a prospect urgently required a local specialist, my good name and a ready CV worked like a charm. Third
... See more
David, I have been working with several direct/foreign clients for some ten years, so I can tell you that besides good luck (+preparation and references), diversification, business awareness, and foreign language skills as a minor is a must.

First, being a young specialist, I sent and personally handed my tailored CVs to local offices of many related companies. Second, when a prospect urgently required a local specialist, my good name and a ready CV worked like a charm. Third, I was put in a favorable light, making my wannabe client pretty sure I’m a worthy decent and reliable specialist, no troublemaker. Fourth, I was brave enough to talk to the clients and business partners as my equals, so they still treat me the same—as a businessman. Fifth, I always can explain my decisions to the clients and other specialists, so they paid my several biz educations in different no-translation areas. Sixth, I'm not only goal-oriented, but also process-involved. Shortly, I'm a valuable dedicated core specialist even without foreign languages; and so on and on.

Considering the recent events, unable to counteract a global dumping, rather many companies were forced to staff reduction and went 'distant', oversaturating the market of ‘pure’ translators and one-field specialists. Unfortunately, it is a big no-no pregnant with consequences, because now most clients would prefer an average multi-specialty freelancer (especially from the provinces in developing countries) to a high-class one-specialty employee, if possible.

While it’s a not so optimistic trend for specialized professionals, I welcome the time when higher entry barriers would finally select only real specialists who can use foreign languages, not ‘pure’ translators. Time shall tell.

Just IMO though

[Edited at 2020-06-10 02:47 GMT]
Collapse


Thayenga
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

What clients can we get?

Advanced search







Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »
TM-Town
Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

More info »



ProZ.com Headquarters
235 Harrison Street Mail Drop #22
Syracuse, NY 13202
USA
+1-315-463-7323
ProZ.com Argentina
Calle 14 nro. 622 1/2 entre 44 y 45
La Plata (B1900AND), Buenos Aires
Argentina
+54-221-425-1266
ProZ.com Ukraine
6 Karazina St.
Kharkiv, 61002
Ukraine
+380 57 7281624
Dawn it-tradutturi jikkoordinaw it-traduzzjoni ta’ ProZ.com f’ Maltese

Team Members: Rita Briffa

Jekk jogħġbok innota li s-sit għadu mhux tradott kollu. Il-lokalizzazzjoni tas-sit qed jipproċedi fi stadji, bis-siti l-aktar attivi jiġu tradotti l-ewwel. Jekk tara xi errur fit-traduzzjoni fi kwalunkwe parti tas-sit li diġà ġie lokalizzat, jekk jogħġbok avża lil wieħed mill-koordinaturi tal-lokalizzazzjoni hawn fuq.
For information on how you can help localize the site, please click here.

Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Fittex għal terminu
  • Xogħol
  • Fora
  • Multiple search