Are there any other artifical lang
Thread poster: Mercer32208
Aug 3, 2009

I know about ido and Esperanto and Esata are there any new artificial languages out there that came about in the last 20 years thanks

 

Richard Bartholomew  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:02
German to English
Sure, lots of new programming languages ... Aug 4, 2009

... like Java (released in 1995), Python (1991), Ruby (also in 1995). These are the ones that come immediately to mind. I'm sure that there are a plenty of niche languages I've never heard of and never will hear of.

 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 09:02
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Google for... Aug 4, 2009

Mercer32208 wrote:
I know about ido and Esperanto and Esata are there any new artificial languages out there that came about in the last 20 years?


Google for "conlang". There are even web sites where people can introduce their own little languages and discuss various ways of creating them.


 

Wolfgang Jörissen  Identity Verified
Belize
Dutch to German
+ ...
Don't forget Klingonian Aug 4, 2009

... for what it's worth

 

Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:02
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
+ ...
Klingonian is too old Aug 4, 2009

Wolfgang Jörissen wrote:

... for what it's worth


Klingonian seems to be older than 20 years, though ...

Andjustinordertoofacilitatereadingfortheopklingonianseemstobelolderthan20years

[Bearbeitet am 2009-08-04 09:51 GMT]


 

Dejan Škrebić  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 09:02
English to Serbian
+ ...
SITE LOCALIZER
Lots of those Aug 4, 2009

Volapuk, an old one; Tokipona, a new one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volapük
http://www.tokipona.org/


 

Jan van Steenbergen
Netherlands
Local time: 09:02
Polish to Dutch
+ ...
Quite a lot! Mar 2, 2010

Mercer32208 wrote:

I know about ido and Esperanto and Esata are there any new artificial languages out there that came about in the last 20 years thanks

Actually, yes. Hundreds of them. But it depends a bit how you describe "artificial language". New languages are presented almost on a daily base, but generally, it's messages of the type "Hey, I've created a new language. It's called _____ and here comes the phonology" - and that's all we will ever hear of it. Most other conlangs are more than that, but the number of them that are actually big enough to write something substantial in is very limited. Still, there are quite a few of them around!

An interesting one to mention is Brithenig, a Romance language that underwent sound changes similar to those of Welsh. Absolutely worth a visit! I've done something similar myself with Wenedyk, a Romance language based on Polish. Well worth mentioning is Sylvia Sotomayor's language Kélen, a language that has no verbs. Actually, I could name quite a few interesting projects... One that has become quite well-known is Na'vi, made for the movie "Avatar". A very nice Romance language without a backstory but with an impressing corpus is called Aingeljã.

In the field of international auxiliary languages, new projects are being launched frequently as well. However, most of them are completely unsuccessful. A language that enjoys some success is Lingua Franca Nova, but it was started in 1965, so it falls outside the reach of your question. Perhaps I should also mention Slovianski, a simplified interslavic language I'm co-author of and that has been a lot in the news lately. Interesting pan-Romance languages are Romanica and Romanova.

Best regards,
Jan


 

DZiW (X)
Ukraine
English to Russian
+ ...
what's the use? Mar 2, 2010

I see language as a means of communication (or some would say 'intercourse
'). It's pretty clear that ancient and dead languages reflected their culture, development and so on.

But what exactly does a 'new' man-made 'neutral' language? Perhaps, it's an attempt to make some 'compromise' while pretending to be an affected parent language for shifting the bright features and distinctions of many, right?

May be it's just difference of opinions, but I'd better learn ab
... See more
I see language as a means of communication (or some would say 'intercourse
'). It's pretty clear that ancient and dead languages reflected their culture, development and so on.

But what exactly does a 'new' man-made 'neutral' language? Perhaps, it's an attempt to make some 'compromise' while pretending to be an affected parent language for shifting the bright features and distinctions of many, right?

May be it's just difference of opinions, but I'd better learn about a dead language which was naturally spoken by thousands of real people several centuries ago. Frankly speaking I can't find any practical use for AL because I only once got Ukrainian> Esperanto offer, yet English turned out to be more desirable)

Cheers
Collapse


 

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz (X)  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 09:02
English to Polish
+ ...
the commitment Mar 2, 2010

The commitment to this sort of science amazes me.

It's like determining whether it is better to be smashed over the head with a full bottle of beer or with an empty bottle. Or making a frog levitate. Must be pure, useless joy!

http://improbable.com/ig/ig-pastwinners.html


 

Jan van Steenbergen
Netherlands
Local time: 09:02
Polish to Dutch
+ ...
Pure joy! Mar 2, 2010

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

The commitment to this sort of science amazes me.

It's like determining whether it is better to be smashed over the head with a full bottle of beer or with an empty bottle. Or making a frog levitate. Must be pure, useless joy!

http://improbable.com/ig/ig-pastwinners.html


Hehe, I must admit that I had a really good laugh when I read this! Wouldn't mind getting nominated for that Prize!

But seriously, I wouldn't call this "science". It's rather the thing that is between science and art. In my opinion, that's quite a natural thing. Many sciences have their counterpart in art as well, and vice versa.

In music, for example, there are composers, performers and musicologists. Being a good performer is not merely a matter of interpreting a composition; it is also a matter of following the train of thought of the composer. You have to understand WHY the composer used these notes instead of other notes, what story he's trying to tell and how the means he's using actually work. Without that, you can play the notes very nicely, throw in all your emotions, and the people might even like it, but it's not the real piece.
To achieve this, knowledge is required, and this is where science comes in. Musicology in particular. All in all, a good musician has to be a little of everything: composer, performer and musicologist, albeit obviously not to the same degree.
And now, here goes: from asking yourself the question "why did the composer use this and not something else?", it's only a small step towards another question: "and what would have happened íf he had done it differently?"

I have always been fascinated by that sort of questions. Not only in the field of music or linguistics, but in other fields as well. I suppose it's a kind of playfullness that is part of my character. I studied history, but what always annoyed me was that questions like "so what would have happened if ..." were never allowed. And it's the same thing with languages. I've always liked asking myself questions like: "What would Polish have looked like if it were a Romance language?" or "We all know that there are East, West and South Slavic languages, but why isn't there a North Slavic group? And if there were, what would it look like? Gotta fix that!" It's like throwing a ball and keep watching it until it stops somewhere. Just like many poems and novels, conlangs are works of poetry or speculative fiction.

Useless? Of course! Joy? Absolutely, if you like this sort of things! I mean, what is the use of a poem? Or a symphony? Or a painting? Or a movie? Obviously nothing, except the pleasure of spending a little while with it. I have always enjoyed watching languages or listening to them, and just like I write music that I would like to have existed in reality, I also create languages that I would have liked to have existed in reality.

Jan

[Edited at 2010-03-02 13:00 GMT]


 

Justin Trumain
United States
Local time: 03:02
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Try This Book Mar 2, 2010

http://www.polyglotproducts.com/search/label/Klingon

 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Maria Castro[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Are there any other artifical lang

Advanced search






Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



ProZ.com Headquarters
235 Harrison Street Mail Drop #22
Syracuse, NY 13202
USA
+1-315-463-7323
ProZ.com Argentina
Calle 14 nro. 622 1/2 entre 44 y 45
La Plata (B1900AND), Buenos Aires
Argentina
+54-221-425-1266
ProZ.com Ukraine
6 Karazina St.
Kharkiv, 61002
Ukraine
+380 57 7281624
Dawn it-tradutturi jikkoordinaw it-traduzzjoni ta’ ProZ.com f’ Maltese

Team Members: Rita Briffa

Jekk jogħġbok innota li s-sit għadu mhux tradott kollu. Il-lokalizzazzjoni tas-sit qed jipproċedi fi stadji, bis-siti l-aktar attivi jiġu tradotti l-ewwel. Jekk tara xi errur fit-traduzzjoni fi kwalunkwe parti tas-sit li diġà ġie lokalizzat, jekk jogħġbok avża lil wieħed mill-koordinaturi tal-lokalizzazzjoni hawn fuq.
For information on how you can help localize the site, please click here.

Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Fittex għal terminu
  • Xogħol
  • Fora
  • Multiple search